July 2017
The Herb Farm

Boozer Farms

 

Taylor Hatchet and her dad Bobby Boozer.

Good Food, Good Folks

As I mentioned in my May column, I took a road trip to visit a couple of farms. I told you about the Wrights at Wright’s Nursery and Greenhouses.

Now, I’ll tell you about the food and folks at Boozer Farms.

I first became acquainted with Boozer Farms two or three years ago when my doctor was away and I got his stand-in instead. Like usual, I interviewed him thoroughly before I accepted his qualifications as being up-to-snuff in my book.

Well, as it turned out, he is my doctor’s best friend and they are both as well-qualified as any medical doctors can be. He’s a good and personable fellow to boot.

During our conversation that day, we somehow got on the subject of growing food, gardening and the like. He told me that his wife owned a farm over in Chilton County. The more we chatted, the more interested I got in his wife’s project.

Lisa Opielinski, Herb’s production assistant, and Taylor Hatchet showing off beautiful kale heads.

 

I told him I wanted to visit their farm and possibly write a little blip about it in my monthly column. Well, I must say the farm is much more impressive than a blip can express.

Taylor Hatchet is the lovely wife of my doctor’s best friend and the daughter of retired Auburn Extension Specialist Bobby Boozer. What a small world it is indeed.

Hatchet has been associated with agriculture in some form or another most of her life. While still in college, she would haul produce to sell at Auburn. That was back in 2003.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in Agriculture and Soil Sciences, and a master’s degree in Plant Pathology, Boozer Farms became her full-time occupation. She took it to full production in 2012.

I have known of Boozer for many years now. Though I had never met him in person until recently, his name would come up often in conversations with some of my other Extension friends. Boozer is certainly a highly respected name amongst the Auburn agriculture community, and it is only fitting he holds the title of production manager at the farm.

Boozer oversees both their 40 acres of sod production, where they produce Bermudagrass, Emerald zoysia and Meyer zoysia grass, as well as the additional 15 acres of fruit and vegetable production.

 

Rows and rows of strawberries!

The fruit and vegetable production, of course, depends on what is in season. During the course of a year, Boozer Farms produces over 20 types of fruits and vegetables. Some of their produce includes peaches; nectarines; highbush blueberries; Natchez blackberries; La Soda red potatoes; large, sweet yellow onions (similar to Vidalia); lettuces; cabbages; broccoli; cauliflower; radishes; kale; squash; zucchini; eggplant; peas; beans; Cherokee purple heirloom tomatoes; Smarty grape tomatoes and two standard types of tomatoes. Oh, and the sweetest strawberries you’ll ever put into your mouth!

Boozer Farms is not a you-pick farm but you are welcome to visit and purchase what is available that day. They are open weekdays 9 a.m.-4 p.m. It’s always best to telephone first in order to make sure they have in stock what you are shopping for. Thursday is the best day to shop at the farm because they are there until about 6 p.m. filling orders for their community supported agriculture.

The Boozer Farms CSA offers several pick-up locations including the farm in Thorsby. Their CSA program is expanding each year and their goal is to add an additional 25 spots each season.

For more information about the freshest produce and fine folks at Boozer Farms, visit their Facebook page at http://facebook.com/BoozerFarms. For information about their CSA, go to http://squareup.com/store/boozer-farms/.

Live © Love © Farm with Boozer Farms at 200 County Rd 242 in Thorsby (35171). You can also contact them at 205-688-6866 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

All this talk about fruits and veggies has made me hungry!

 

KALE, BEANS AND ONIONS

In a 10-inch skillet over medium heat, put in 1 tablespoon olive oil to coat the bottom. Add enough kale to liberally fill the bottom of the pan and cover. In a small bowl or cup, combine 1½ teaspoons soy sauce with 1 cup water. Add to skillet. Cut half a sweet yellow onion into pieces. Add to skillet and stir; replace cover. After the kale begins to wilt, add green beans to the skillet and cook until desired tenderness.

 

SAUSAGES, CABBAGE AND KALE

In a 10-inch skillet over medium heat, put in 1 tablespoon olive oil to coat the bottom. Place sausages into skillet and cover. Cook until done and remove from skillet. Add enough kale to liberally fill the bottom of the skillet. Cut half a sweet yellow onion into pieces. Add to the skillet. In a small bowl or cup, combine 1½ teaspoons soy sauce to 1 cup water. Add to skillet. Add about 3 cups of coarsely chopped cabbage; cover and cook until desired tenderness.

 

STRAWBERRY CAKE

1 box white or yellow cake mix
1 (3-ounce) box strawberry Jello
3 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
2/3 cup coconut oil
4 eggs
½ cup milk
¾ cup mashed strawberries

Preheat oven to 350°. Prepare three 8-inch cake pans. In a mixing bowl, place all ingredients and mix on low speed until everything is blended. Increase speed to medium and mix for an additional 3 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl.

Bake for about 30 minutes or until the toothpick tester comes out clean.

Frost with your favorite cream cheese frosting and top with fresh strawberries from Boozer Farms. Yum!

 

Have a happy Independence Day! Get ready to start your fall crops in late August!

I eat my yard! You should eat yours, too!

Until next time, remember to watch your salt and sugar, drink plenty of pure water, and breathe in and out!

Thanks for reading!

For more information, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. I’ll answer your questions and I enjoy the emails!

Be sure to find me on Facebook at Herb Farmer-The Herb Farm.

 

As always, check with an expert, like your doctor, before using any herbal remedy.